PATIENT STORIES

In this section, we will explore:

  • Video of a featured patient discussing his experience with PRADAXA
  • Additional patients sharing their treatment journey with PRADAXA

Featured Patient Taking PRADAXA

George

Age

70

Taking
PRADAXA
since

2017

Meet George:

George is a retired lawyer who was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFib) not caused by a heart valve problem in April 2017. In the video, George talks about his interests, his diagnosis, and how his doctor started his treatment with PRADAXA to reduce the risk of stroke.

"Being on PRADAXA helps me reduce my risk of having a stroke related to AFib. This is really important to me while I live my independent and active lifestyle." - George

Additional patients share their PRADAXA stories

Each patient taking PRADAXA has their own story about their symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment journey. A few of these patients share their experiences below.

Actor Portrayal

Gordon

Meet Gordon:

Gordon considers himself an outdoorsman. Since retiring in 2004, Gordon has enjoyed target shooting with his sons and grandkids. He also likes taking long walks in the woods with his beloved dogs for relaxation.

"Being retired for over 15 years, I like to stay active and involved. Spending time outdoors helps provide me with the physical activity I need and enjoy." - Gordon

About his condition:

After experiencing a fainting episode in 2010, Gordon decided it was time to see his doctor. It was during a follow-up procedure that his doctor diagnosed Gordon with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem.

"This whole episode really threw me for a loop, particularly when the doctor told me I had AFib. I wasn’t sure what to do." - Gordon

About his treatment:

When he received his AFib diagnosis, Gordon discussed various blood thinners with his doctor, family and friends. Based on everything he learned, he and his doctor agreed he would start treatment with PRADAXA.

Today, Gordon follows his doctor’s instructions by taking PRADAXA twice a day. His doctor told him to not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to him first, because stopping PRADAXA increases your risk of having a stroke. He has confidence in his treatment plan and his physician continues to prescribe PRADAXA for him.

"I’ve been taking PRADAXA for many years. I do my best to stay active but I don’t push myself too far. Right now, life is good." - Gordon

Fritz

Meet Fritz:

Fritz is an educator. He earned his undergraduate degree in History, and a Masters Degree in Special Education. Though Fritz is a below-the-knee amputee, he plays golf 2-3 times a week, participates in sled hockey, does his own household chores—including cooking and cleaning, and loves spending time with his mini Schnauzer, Hanna.

"I’ve had some challenges in my life, but I’ve found they only make me more determined. Life is what you make of it, and I strive to make it as good as it can be." - Fritz

About his condition:

In 2013, Fritz was diagnosed with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem. Out of concern regarding his increased risk of stroke, a member of Fritz’s family suggested that he see his doctor and ask if he could be placed on PRADAXA to reduce his risk of stroke.

"When I was diagnosed, I really didn’t know much about AFib. Thank goodness a family member did some research and learned about the risk of stroke that comes with it." - Fritz

About his treatment:

Fritz’s doctor agreed that PRADAXA could be the right choice. Now Fritz takes PRADAXA as prescribed to reduce his risk of stroke due to AFib not caused by a heart valve problem. He follows the regimen his doctor prescribed and he does not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to his doctor, because stopping PRADAXA increases the risk of stroke. He continues to travel to work each day, and to live an independent and active lifestyle.

And while Fritz recognizes that PRADAXA is helping to reduce his risk of stroke, he takes comfort in the fact that there is a specific reversal treatment available in hospitals nationwide* in the rare event of an emergency.

"Knowing that there’s a reversal treatment made just for people taking PRADAXA available nationwide* is very reassuring. If I ever fall and have an emergency situation, I know that help is not far away." - Fritz

Gregg

Meet Gregg:

Gregg is always on the go. Aside from making ongoing improvements to his home, Gregg loves boating, camping, coaching and scouting for youth basketball, as well as spending time with his 4 children and grandson.

"I still feel young and fit enough to be active, so I keep at it. Plus, family time is so important to me, so we do a lot of the activities together." - Gregg

About his condition:

In 2001, Gregg was feeling a certain level of malaise, so he made a doctor’s appointment, which led to his diagnosis of AFib not caused by a heart valve problem. His doctor put him on warfarin to reduce his risk of stroke.

As a result, Gregg was required to have his INR (International Normalized Ratio—a measurement of the time it takes for blood to clot) checked on a regular basis.

"On warfarin, needing routine INR blood monitoring was very inconvenient and it became a long and extensive process. I asked my doctor to switch me to PRADAXA, with its twice a day dose schedule. PRADAXA requires no INR testing, which is much more convenient for me." - Gregg

About his treatment:

Upon learning about PRADAXA in 2011, Gregg talked to his physician. Along with having a twice a day dosing schedule, PRADAXA doesn’t require INR testing, so his doctor put him on PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily. Gregg’s doctor reminded him to not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to him first, because stopping PRADAXA increases the risk of stroke.

Gregg appreciates the fact that PRADAXA has a reversal treatment made specifically for people taking PRADAXA that works to reverse the effects of his blood thinner in the rare event of an emergency situation.

"As active as I am, I feel confident in knowing that if I need emergency surgery again, the reversal treatment made just for people taking PRADAXA is available in hospitals nationwide."*1 - Gregg

Don

Meet Don:

Even though he’s retired, Don isn’t one to lay low. For one thing, he’s an avid golfer, so he spends a fair amount on the links when he’s staying at his seasonal home. Plus, he loves to cook for his family, no matter where they are.

About his condition:

A few years back, Don was worried that being active wasn’t going to be possible. He wasn’t feeling himself, so he made an appointment to see his doctor. His diagnosis was concerning: AFib not caused by a heart valve problem and a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). So, his doctor prescribed PRADAXA to reduce his risk of stroke due to AFib, and to treat the blood clots in the veins of his legs and to reduce the risk of them occuring again.

While Don was relieved to hear that his condition could effectively be treated, he still had concerns about his frequent drives between their two homes. What if he was in a car accident and had to be taken to the hospital for life threatening bleeding or an emergency surgery? How would the doctors handle him being on a blood thinner?

"Since I was frequently driving long distances between our two homes, I asked my doctor whether he could prescribe me a blood thinner with a widely available reversal treatment…because you never know what might happen when you’re on the road." - Don

About his treatment:

The idea of having access to a reversal treatment is what drove Don to ask his doctor about PRADAXA. His doctor agreed, which led Don to PRADAXA.com—and immediately to the site’s reversal locator. Today, Don wears a medical alert necklace to notify ER personnel that he is taking PRADAXA which has a specific reversal treatment made just for people taking PRADAXA for use in emergency situations.

"My father will be on the golf course and tell friends “if you’re on a blood thinner to reduce your risk of stroke due to AFib not caused by a heart valve problem, you should ask your doctor about PRADAXA, because it has a reversal agent made just for people taking PRADAXA available nationwide."*1 - Ken, Don’s son

Actor Portrayal

Revilla

Meet Revilla:

It hasn’t been all that long since Revilla retired from the medical profession. As a former Ob/Gyn, she’s well-versed on how medical issues can impact patients—and potentially disrupt their lives.

About her condition:

Around the time of her retirement, Revilla got some concerning news of her own. She was diagnosed with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem. Her first thought was her risk of stroke. After sharing her fears with her cardiologist, he prescribed PRADAXA.

Revilla was already familiar with the benefit of stroke risk reduction with PRADAXA for people with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem. But taking a blood thinner raised another concern for her: her love of travel.

"I love to travel and see the world. I go back and forth to the Philippines at least once a year. That is why I asked my cardiologist about PRADAXA. Having a specific reversal treatment with international availability is important to me." - Revilla

About her treatment:

Revilla still enjoys her freedom to travel away from her home and having the peace of mind in knowing there is a reversal treatment available nationwide* and internationally if needed in an emergency.†1

"I was concerned about my mom being on a blood thinner while traveling as much as she does—especially to the Philippines. But it felt like PRADAXA was a reassuring option, since it has a reversal agent made just for people taking PRADAXA, available in case of an emergency not only in her home state but also in the Philippines." - Abigail, Revilla’s daughter

*Accurate as of 05/31/2019, based on the current information provided to Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The company cannot guarantee the availability of the specific reversal treatment at all facilities in every state.

Accurate as of 05/31/2019, based on the current information provided to Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. No guarantee can be made as to the availability of the specific reversal treatment at all facilities within any country.

Reference: 1. Data on file. Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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PRADAXA
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What is PRADAXA?

Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) capsules is a prescription blood thinner medicine that lowers the chance of blood clots forming in your body. PRADAXA is used to:

  • reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots in people who have a medical condition called atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem. With atrial fibrillation, part of the heart does not beat the way it should. This can lead to blood clots forming and increase your risk of a stroke.
  • treat blood clots in the veins of your legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism) and reduce the risk of them occurring again.

PRADAXA is not for use in people with artificial (prosthetic) heart valves.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

For people taking PRADAXA for atrial fibrillation: Do not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. Stopping PRADAXA increases your risk of having a stroke. PRADAXA may need to be stopped prior to surgery or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking PRADAXA and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking PRADAXA, your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming.

PRADAXA can cause bleeding which can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Don’t take PRADAXA if you:

  • currently have abnormal bleeding;
  • have ever had an allergic reaction to it;
  • have had or plan to have a valve in your heart replaced

Your risk of bleeding with PRADAXA may be higher if you:

  • are 75 years old or older
  • have kidney problems
  • have stomach or intestine bleeding that is recent or keeps coming back or you have a stomach ulcer
  • take other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, like aspirin products, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and blood thinners
  • have kidney problems and take dronedarone (Multaq®) or ketoconazole tablets (Nizoral®)

Call your doctor or seek immediate medical care if you have any of the following signs or symptoms of bleeding:

  • any unexpected, severe, or uncontrollable bleeding; or bleeding that lasts a long time
  • unusual or unexpected bruising
  • coughing up or vomiting blood; or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • pink or brown urine; red or black stools (looks like tar)
  • unexpected pain, swelling, or joint pain
  • headaches and feeling dizzy or weak

Spinal or epidural blood clots (hematoma). People who take PRADAXA and have medicine injected into their spinal and epidural area, or have a spinal puncture have a risk of forming a blood clot that can cause long-term or permanent loss of the ability to move (paralysis). Your risk of developing a spinal or epidural blood clot is higher if:

  • a thin tube called an epidural catheter is placed in your back to give you certain medicine
  • you take NSAIDs or a medicine to prevent blood from clotting
  • you have a history of difficult or repeated epidural or spinal punctures
  • you have a history of problems with your spine or have had surgery on your spine.

If you take PRADAXA and receive spinal anesthesia or have a spinal puncture, your doctor should watch you closely for symptoms of spinal or epidural blood clots. Tell your doctor right away if you have back pain, tingling, numbness, muscle weakness (especially in your legs and feet), loss of control of the bowels or bladder (incontinence).

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if PRADAXA will harm your unborn baby. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment with PRADAXA.

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if PRADAXA passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take PRADAXA or breastfeed.

Take PRADAXA exactly as prescribed. It is important to tell your doctors about all medicines (prescription and over‑the‑counter), vitamins, and supplements you take. Some medicines may affect the way PRADAXA works.

PRADAXA can cause indigestion, stomach upset or burning, and stomach pain.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

CL-PX-100034 January 2019

Please see full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

See more See less

What is PRADAXA?

Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) capsules is a prescription blood thinner medicine that lowers the chance of blood clots forming in your body. PRADAXA is used to:

  • reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots in people who have a medical condition called atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem. With atrial fibrillation, part of the heart does not beat the way it should. This can lead to blood clots forming and increase your risk of a stroke.
  • treat blood clots in the veins of your legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism) and reduce the risk of them occurring again.

PRADAXA is not for use in people with artificial (prosthetic) heart valves.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

For people taking PRADAXA for atrial fibrillation: Do not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. Stopping PRADAXA increases your risk of having a stroke. PRADAXA may need to be stopped prior to surgery or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking PRADAXA and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking PRADAXA, your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming.

PRADAXA can cause bleeding which can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Don’t take PRADAXA if you:

  • currently have abnormal bleeding;
  • have ever had an allergic reaction to it;
  • have had or plan to have a valve in your heart replaced

Your risk of bleeding with PRADAXA may be higher if you:

  • are 75 years old or older
  • have kidney problems
  • have stomach or intestine bleeding that is recent or keeps coming back or you have a stomach ulcer
  • take other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, like aspirin products, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and blood thinners
  • have kidney problems and take dronedarone (Multaq®) or ketoconazole tablets (Nizoral®)

Call your doctor or seek immediate medical care if you have any of the following signs or symptoms of bleeding:

  • any unexpected, severe, or uncontrollable bleeding; or bleeding that lasts a long time
  • unusual or unexpected bruising
  • coughing up or vomiting blood; or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • pink or brown urine; red or black stools (looks like tar)
  • unexpected pain, swelling, or joint pain
  • headaches and feeling dizzy or weak

Spinal or epidural blood clots (hematoma). People who take PRADAXA and have medicine injected into their spinal and epidural area, or have a spinal puncture have a risk of forming a blood clot that can cause long-term or permanent loss of the ability to move (paralysis). Your risk of developing a spinal or epidural blood clot is higher if:

  • a thin tube called an epidural catheter is placed in your back to give you certain medicine
  • you take NSAIDs or a medicine to prevent blood from clotting
  • you have a history of difficult or repeated epidural or spinal punctures
  • you have a history of problems with your spine or have had surgery on your spine.

If you take PRADAXA and receive spinal anesthesia or have a spinal puncture, your doctor should watch you closely for symptoms of spinal or epidural blood clots. Tell your doctor right away if you have back pain, tingling, numbness, muscle weakness (especially in your legs and feet), loss of control of the bowels or bladder (incontinence).

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if PRADAXA will harm your unborn baby. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment with PRADAXA.

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if PRADAXA passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take PRADAXA or breastfeed.

Take PRADAXA exactly as prescribed. It is important to tell your doctors about all medicines (prescription and over‑the‑counter), vitamins, and supplements you take. Some medicines may affect the way PRADAXA works.

PRADAXA can cause indigestion, stomach upset or burning, and stomach pain.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

CL-PX-100034 January 2019

Please see full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.