Specific Reversal Treatment

In this section, we will explore:

  • A reversal treatment for PRADAXA
  • A locator to find the nearest of the 3,300+ hospitals that stock the reversal treatment*

*Accurate as of 05/31/2019, based on the current information provided to Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The company cannot guarantee the availability of the specific reversal treatment at all facilities in every state.

About the Reversal Treatment for PRADAXA

Whether it’s for emergency surgery or urgent procedures, or life-threatening or uncontrolled bleeding, there are rare instances when people taking blood thinners need to have their blood clot normally again. These instances may require the ability to reverse the effects of the blood thinner.

PRADAXA is a blood thinner with an FDA approved reversal treatment made just for people taking PRADAXA.

"As active as I am, I feel confident in knowing that if I need emergency surgery again, the reversal treatment made just for people taking PRADAXA is available in hospitals nationwide." - Gregg, 61

What is PRAXBIND?

Praxbind® (idarucizumab) injection is a reversal treatment made for people taking PRADAXA. PRAXBIND allows your blood to clot normally again in the event of an emergency surgery or urgent procedure, or in the case of life-threatening or uncontrolled bleeding.

Reversal Icon

PRAXBIND provides reversal of the blood thinning effect of PRADAXA to allow blood
to clot again

Hospital Icon

PRAXBIND is administered by a healthcare professional in a hospital setting

Doctor Icon

Once your doctor decides it is medically appropriate, PRADAXA should be restarted to help reduce the risk of blood clots and stroke

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR PRAXBIND

Reversing PRADAXA increases your risk of stroke and blood clots. Your doctor will restart you on a blood thinner as soon as possible to reduce the risk.

Call your doctor or seek immediate medical care if you have any signs or symptoms of bleeding.

Important information you need to know for emergency situations. Watch our video here:

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR PRAXBIND, continued

Your doctor will check for signs of an allergic reaction when you are taking PRAXBIND. Tell your doctor if you have a hereditary fructose intolerance or have ever had an allergic reaction to sorbitol, one of the ingredients in PRAXBIND.

The most common side effects of PRAXBIND include constipation and nausea.

PRADAXA Reversal Treatment Locator

PRAXBIND is available in 3,300+ hospitals across all 50 states*1

To look for a hospital near you that keeps PRAXBIND on hand*, enter your location below.

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*Accurate as of 05/31/2019. Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. cannot guarantee the availability of the specific reversal treatment at the facilities listed on this page. Based on the most current information available to Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., these facilities have purchased the specific reversal treatment.

Reference: 1. Data on file. Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

"Knowing that there’s a reversal treatment made just for people taking PRADAXA available nationwide is very reassuring. If I ever fall and have an emergency situation, I know that help is not far away." - Fritz, 65

Important Safety Information for PRAXBIND

What is PRAXBIND?

Praxbind® (idarucizumab) injection is a reversal treatment made for people taking PRADAXA. PRAXBIND allows your blood to clot normally again in the event of an emergency surgery or urgent procedure, or in the case of life-threatening or uncontrolled bleeding.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR PRAXBIND

Reversing PRADAXA increases your risk of stroke and blood clots. Your doctor will restart you on a blood thinner as soon as possible to reduce the risk.

Call your doctor or seek immediate medical care if you have any signs or symptoms of bleeding.

Your doctor will check for signs of an allergic reaction when you are taking PRAXBIND. Tell your doctor if you have a hereditary fructose intolerance or have ever had an allergic reaction to sorbitol, one of the ingredients in PRAXBIND.

The most common side effects of PRAXBIND include constipation and nausea.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

CL-PB-100002 April 2018

Please click here for full Prescribing Information for PRAXBIND.

See more See less

What is PRADAXA?

Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) capsules is a prescription blood thinner medicine that lowers the chance of blood clots forming in your body. PRADAXA is used to:

  • reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots in people who have a medical condition called atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem. With atrial fibrillation, part of the heart does not beat the way it should. This can lead to blood clots forming and increase your risk of a stroke.
  • treat blood clots in the veins of your legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism) and reduce the risk of them occurring again.

PRADAXA is not for use in people with artificial (prosthetic) heart valves.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

For people taking PRADAXA for atrial fibrillation: Do not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. Stopping PRADAXA increases your risk of having a stroke. PRADAXA may need to be stopped prior to surgery or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking PRADAXA and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking PRADAXA, your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming.

PRADAXA can cause bleeding which can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Don’t take PRADAXA if you:

  • currently have abnormal bleeding;
  • have ever had an allergic reaction to it;
  • have had or plan to have a valve in your heart replaced

Your risk of bleeding with PRADAXA may be higher if you:

  • are 75 years old or older
  • have kidney problems
  • have stomach or intestine bleeding that is recent or keeps coming back or you have a stomach ulcer
  • take other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, like aspirin products, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and blood thinners
  • have kidney problems and take dronedarone (Multaq®) or ketoconazole tablets (Nizoral®)

Call your doctor or seek immediate medical care if you have any of the following signs or symptoms of bleeding:

  • any unexpected, severe, or uncontrollable bleeding; or bleeding that lasts a long time
  • unusual or unexpected bruising
  • coughing up or vomiting blood; or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • pink or brown urine; red or black stools (looks like tar)
  • unexpected pain, swelling, or joint pain
  • headaches and feeling dizzy or weak

Spinal or epidural blood clots (hematoma). People who take PRADAXA and have medicine injected into their spinal and epidural area, or have a spinal puncture have a risk of forming a blood clot that can cause long-term or permanent loss of the ability to move (paralysis). Your risk of developing a spinal or epidural blood clot is higher if:

  • a thin tube called an epidural catheter is placed in your back to give you certain medicine
  • you take NSAIDs or a medicine to prevent blood from clotting
  • you have a history of difficult or repeated epidural or spinal punctures
  • you have a history of problems with your spine or have had surgery on your spine.

If you take PRADAXA and receive spinal anesthesia or have a spinal puncture, your doctor should watch you closely for symptoms of spinal or epidural blood clots. Tell your doctor right away if you have back pain, tingling, numbness, muscle weakness (especially in your legs and feet), loss of control of the bowels or bladder (incontinence).

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if PRADAXA will harm your unborn baby. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment with PRADAXA.

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if PRADAXA passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take PRADAXA or breastfeed.

Take PRADAXA exactly as prescribed. It is important to tell your doctors about all medicines (prescription and over‑the‑counter), vitamins, and supplements you take. Some medicines may affect the way PRADAXA works.

PRADAXA can cause indigestion, stomach upset or burning, and stomach pain.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

CL-PX-100034 January 2019

Please see full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

See more See less

What is PRADAXA?

Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) capsules is a prescription blood thinner medicine that lowers the chance of blood clots forming in your body. PRADAXA is used to:

  • reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots in people who have a medical condition called atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem. With atrial fibrillation, part of the heart does not beat the way it should. This can lead to blood clots forming and increase your risk of a stroke.
  • treat blood clots in the veins of your legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism) and reduce the risk of them occurring again.

PRADAXA is not for use in people with artificial (prosthetic) heart valves.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

For people taking PRADAXA for atrial fibrillation: Do not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. Stopping PRADAXA increases your risk of having a stroke. PRADAXA may need to be stopped prior to surgery or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking PRADAXA and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking PRADAXA, your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming.

PRADAXA can cause bleeding which can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Don’t take PRADAXA if you:

  • currently have abnormal bleeding;
  • have ever had an allergic reaction to it;
  • have had or plan to have a valve in your heart replaced

Your risk of bleeding with PRADAXA may be higher if you:

  • are 75 years old or older
  • have kidney problems
  • have stomach or intestine bleeding that is recent or keeps coming back or you have a stomach ulcer
  • take other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, like aspirin products, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and blood thinners
  • have kidney problems and take dronedarone (Multaq®) or ketoconazole tablets (Nizoral®)

Call your doctor or seek immediate medical care if you have any of the following signs or symptoms of bleeding:

  • any unexpected, severe, or uncontrollable bleeding; or bleeding that lasts a long time
  • unusual or unexpected bruising
  • coughing up or vomiting blood; or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • pink or brown urine; red or black stools (looks like tar)
  • unexpected pain, swelling, or joint pain
  • headaches and feeling dizzy or weak

Spinal or epidural blood clots (hematoma). People who take PRADAXA and have medicine injected into their spinal and epidural area, or have a spinal puncture have a risk of forming a blood clot that can cause long-term or permanent loss of the ability to move (paralysis). Your risk of developing a spinal or epidural blood clot is higher if:

  • a thin tube called an epidural catheter is placed in your back to give you certain medicine
  • you take NSAIDs or a medicine to prevent blood from clotting
  • you have a history of difficult or repeated epidural or spinal punctures
  • you have a history of problems with your spine or have had surgery on your spine.

If you take PRADAXA and receive spinal anesthesia or have a spinal puncture, your doctor should watch you closely for symptoms of spinal or epidural blood clots. Tell your doctor right away if you have back pain, tingling, numbness, muscle weakness (especially in your legs and feet), loss of control of the bowels or bladder (incontinence).

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if PRADAXA will harm your unborn baby. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment with PRADAXA.

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if PRADAXA passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take PRADAXA or breastfeed.

Take PRADAXA exactly as prescribed. It is important to tell your doctors about all medicines (prescription and over‑the‑counter), vitamins, and supplements you take. Some medicines may affect the way PRADAXA works.

PRADAXA can cause indigestion, stomach upset or burning, and stomach pain.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

CL-PX-100034 January 2019

Please see full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.