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Staying on Track

Helpful tips and information to help you start and stay on treatment

Managing your treatment can be challenging, but following the plan that your doctor has developed is important to your health. Staying organized, communicating effectively with your doctor, learning about your condition, making healthy choices, and taking time to enjoy the things you love, can help your treatment journey. Here’s some information and tips to help you stay on track:

AFib
DVT or PE

When reducing risk of stroke, it’s important to stay the course

You may be at risk of stroke, even without any noticeable symptoms

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is most often a chronic condition, and your risk of stroke may not go away. That’s why it’s important to continue to take PRADAXA, as prescribed by your doctor, to reduce your risk of stroke. Subscribing to our Refill Reminders can help you remember to refill your PRADAXA prescription, so you don’t run out. Stopping PRADAXA may increase your risk of having a stroke or forming blood clots.

Your medicine

  • Organize your medicines. Keep them in the same place. Use a calendar to keep track of what to take and when. Keep PRADAXA stored in its original bottle or blister pack. Learn about storing PRADAXA
  • Keep your medical history and medication list updated. Some medicines may change the way PRADAXA or other medicines work in your body. Other medicines can increase your risk of bleeding and other side effects. Include all prescription, nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines, vitamins, herbs, and other supplements on your list and make sure to share this information with your doctor. Learn more about PRADAXA and your other medicines
  • Get Refill Reminders. It’s a service from the SolutionsPlus® support program and can help you ensure that you don’t run out of your medication. You can receive reminders by email. For additional ongoing support, sign up for the SolutionsPlus® support program
  • Make sure you understand how to take your medicine. It’s important to take your medicine exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Learn how to take PRADAXA

Your doctor

  • Keep up with scheduled doctor visits. You’ll need to work closely with your healthcare team to manage your condition and reduce your risk of stroke. Your team may include:
    • Your primary care provider – the person who cares for your general health. This may be a family physician, internist, nurse practitioner, or physician’s assistant
    • A cardiologist – a doctor who specializes in treating conditions that affect the heart
    • An electrophysiologist – a cardiologist who works specifically with heart rhythm disorders (also called arrhythmias), such as AFib
  • If you need a ride to and from doctor visits, consider asking a trusted friend or family member to come along. Or ask your doctor’s office about local transportation services
  • Review your treatment options with your doctor. PRADAXA was the first approved alternative to warfarin, also known as Coumadin® or Jantoven®, for reducing risk of stroke in people with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem. The Doctor Discussion Guide is an easy way to start the conversation. Learn about PRADAXA
  • Learn more about your condition. Understanding AFib and its related complications can help you feel empowered. And it can help you better express your needs to your doctor and loved ones

Yourself

  • Get the support you need. When you’re facing a potentially serious medical condition, getting support from others is key. You shouldn’t feel shy or embarrassed about involving family and friends
  • Take advantage of your most important partner, your doctor. The Doctor Discussion Guide can help you have a more productive conversation with your doctor
  • Stay active. Exercise is an important part of staying healthy. Talk to your doctor before starting any exercise program to ensure you’re doing activities that are safe for you
  • Make time to relax. Try planning a special day out with a friend or loved one, a trip to a favorite place, or another activity you enjoy
  • Plan for travel. Talk to your doctor about changes in your routine, such as traveling. If you travel by plane, carry your medicines instead of checking them with your luggage
  • Manage your stress. Being diagnosed with a medical condition can cause stress. If left unmanaged, stress can actually make the situation worse by interfering with sleep and healthy eating habits, for instance

DVT and PE: stay on track with treatment

Take PRADAXA exactly as prescribed

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are serious conditions that can be life threatening. That’s why it’s important to continue to take PRADAXA, as prescribed by your doctor, to treat DVT and PE, and to reduce the risk of recurrence. Subscribing to our Refill Reminders can help you remember to refill your PRADAXA prescription, so you don’t run out.

Your medicine

  • Organize your medicines. Keep them in the same place. Use a calendar to keep track of what to take and when. Keep PRADAXA stored in its original bottle or blister pack. Learn about storing PRADAXA
  • Keep your medical history and medication list updated. Some medicines may change the way PRADAXA or other medicines work in your body. Other medicines can increase your risk of bleeding and other side effects. Include all prescription, nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines, vitamins, herbs, and other supplements on your list and make sure to share this information with your doctor. Learn more about PRADAXA and your other medicines
  • Get Refill Reminders. It’s a service from the SolutionsPlus® support program and can help you ensure that you don’t run out of your medication. You can receive reminders by email. For additional ongoing support, sign up for the SolutionsPlus® support program
  • Make sure you understand how to take your medicine. It’s important to take your medicine exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Learn how to take PRADAXA

Your doctor

  • Keep up with scheduled doctor visits. You’ll need to work closely with your healthcare team to manage your condition and reduce your risk of stroke. Your team may include:
    • Your primary care provider – the person who cares for your general health. This may be a family physician, internist, nurse practitioner, or physician’s assistant
    • A specialist – you may be referred to a specialist, such as a vascular surgeon or an interventional radiologist, once your primary care provider has evaluated you and your symptoms
  • If you need a ride to and from doctor visits, consider asking a trusted friend or family member to come along. Or ask your doctor’s office about local transportation services
  • Review your treatment options with your doctor. On the basis of 3 clinical trials, PRADAXA is approved to treat blood clots in the veins of your legs (DVT) or lungs (PE) in patients who have been treated with an injectable blood thinner for 5 to 10 days, and to reduce the risk of recurrence. The Doctor Discussion Guide is an easy way to start the conversation. Learn about PRADAXA
  • Learn more about your condition. Understanding DVT and PE and their related complications can help you feel empowered. And it can help you better express your needs to your doctor and loved ones

Yourself

  • Get the support you need. When you’re facing a potentially serious medical condition, getting support from others is key. You shouldn’t feel shy or embarrassed about involving family and friends
  • Take advantage of your most important partner, your doctor. The Doctor Discussion Guide can help you have a more productive conversation with your doctor
  • Stay active. Exercise is an important part of staying healthy. Talk to your doctor before starting any exercise program to ensure you’re doing activities that are safe for you
  • Make time to relax. Try planning a special day out with a friend or loved one, a trip to a favorite place, or another activity you enjoy
  • Plan for travel. Talk to your doctor about changes in your routine, such as traveling. If you travel by plane, carry your medicines instead of checking them with your luggage
  • Manage your stress. Being diagnosed with a medical condition can cause stress. If left unmanaged, stress can actually make the situation worse by interfering with sleep and healthy eating habits, for instance

Do you know how PRADAXA
compares to warfarin?

Discover the differences

Do you know how PRADAXA
compares to warfarin?

Discover the differences

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND USE OF PRADAXA

For people taking PRADAXA for atrial fibrillation: Do not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. Stopping PRADAXA increases your risk of having a stroke. PRADAXA may need to be stopped prior to surgery or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking PRADAXA and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking PRADAXA, your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming.

PRADAXA can cause bleeding which can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Don’t take PRADAXA if you:

  • currently have abnormal bleeding;
  • have ever had an allergic reaction to it;
  • have had or plan to have a valve in your heart replaced

Your risk of bleeding with PRADAXA may be higher if you:

  • are 75 years old or older
  • have kidney problems
  • have stomach or intestine bleeding that is recent or keeps coming back or you have a stomach ulcer
  • take other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, like aspirin products, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and blood thinners
  • have kidney problems and take dronedarone (Multaq®) or ketoconazole tablets (Nizoral®)

Call your doctor or seek immediate medical care if you have any of the following signs or symptoms of bleeding:

  • any unexpected, severe, or uncontrollable bleeding; or bleeding that lasts a long time
  • unusual or unexpected bruising
  • coughing up or vomiting blood; or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • pink or brown urine; red or black stools (looks like tar)
  • unexpected pain, swelling, or joint pain
  • headaches and feeling dizzy or weak

Spinal or epidural blood clots (hematoma). People who take PRADAXA and have medicine injected into their spinal and epidural area, or have a spinal puncture have a risk of forming a blood clot that can cause long-term or permanent loss of the ability to move (paralysis). Your risk of developing a spinal or epidural blood clot is higher if:

  • a thin tube called an epidural catheter is placed in your back to give you certain medicine
  • you take NSAIDs or a medicine to prevent blood from clotting
  • you have a history of difficult or repeated epidural or spinal punctures
  • you have a history of problems with your spine or have had surgery on your spine.

If you take PRADAXA and receive spinal anesthesia or have a spinal puncture, your doctor should watch you closely for symptoms of spinal or epidural blood clots. Tell your doctor right away if you have back pain, tingling, numbness, muscle weakness (especially in your legs and feet), loss of control of the bowels or bladder (incontinence).

Take PRADAXA exactly as prescribed. It is important to tell your doctors about all medicines (prescription and over‑the‑counter), vitamins, and supplements you take. Some medicines may affect the way PRADAXA works.

PRADAXA can cause indigestion, stomach upset or burning, and stomach pain.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-10881-800-FDA-1088.

What is PRADAXA?

PRADAXA is a prescription blood thinner medicine that lowers the chance of blood clots forming in your body.
PRADAXA is used to:

  • reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots in people who have a medical condition called atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem. With atrial fibrillation, part of the heart does not beat the way it should. This can lead to blood clots forming and increase your risk of a stroke.
  • treat blood clots in the veins of your legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism) and reduce the risk of them occurring again.

PRADAXA is not for use in people with artificial (prosthetic) heart valves.

Please see full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

The health information contained in this Website is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare professional. All decisions regarding patient care must be made with a healthcare professional, considering the unique characteristics of the patient.

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. either owns or uses the trademarks Pradaxa®, PRADAXA with associated design ®, SolutionsPlus® and related images under license. Other referenced trademarks are owned by third parties.

This site is intended for U.S. residents only. Products discussed herein may have different names and labeling in different countries.

Use of this site is subject to the Internet Site Legal Notices and Disclaimers and Privacy Notice

Copyright © 2016 Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All Rights Reserved. [4/16]

PC-PX-0196-CONS

SEE MORE

Important safety information and use of PRADAXA

For people taking PRADAXA for atrial fibrillation: Do not stop taking PRADAXA without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. Stopping PRADAXA increases your risk of having a stroke. PRADAXA may need to be stopped prior to surgery or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking PRADAXA and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking PRADAXA, your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming.

PRADAXA can cause bleeding which can be serious and sometimes lead to death. Don’t take PRADAXA if you:

  • currently have abnormal bleeding;
  • have ever had an allergic reaction to it;
  • have had or plan to have a valve in your heart replaced

Your risk of bleeding with PRADAXA may be higher if you:

  • are 75 years old or older
  • have kidney problems
  • have stomach or intestine bleeding that is recent or keeps coming back or you have a stomach ulcer
  • take other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, like aspirin products, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and blood thinners
  • have kidney problems and take dronedarone (Multaq®) or ketoconazole tablets (Nizoral®)

Call your doctor or seek immediate medical care if you have any of the following signs or symptoms of bleeding:

  • any unexpected, severe, or uncontrollable bleeding; or bleeding that lasts a long time
  • unusual or unexpected bruising
  • coughing up or vomiting blood; or vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • pink or brown urine; red or black stools (looks like tar)
  • unexpected pain, swelling, or joint pain
  • headaches and feeling dizzy or weak

Spinal or epidural blood clots (hematoma). People who take PRADAXA and have medicine injected into their spinal and epidural area, or have a spinal puncture have a risk of forming a blood clot that can cause long-term or permanent loss of the ability to move (paralysis). Your risk of developing a spinal or epidural blood clot is higher if:

  • a thin tube called an epidural catheter is placed in your back to give you certain medicine
  • you take NSAIDs or a medicine to prevent blood from clotting
  • you have a history of difficult or repeated epidural or spinal punctures
  • you have a history of problems with your spine or have had surgery on your spine.

If you take PRADAXA and receive spinal anesthesia or have a spinal puncture, your doctor should watch you closely for symptoms of spinal or epidural blood clots. Tell your doctor right away if you have back pain, tingling, numbness, muscle weakness (especially in your legs and feet), loss of control of the bowels or bladder (incontinence).

Take PRADAXA exactly as prescribed. It is important to tell your doctors about all medicines, vitamins, and supplements you take. Some medicines may affect the way PRADAXA works.

PRADAXA can cause indigestion, stomach upset or burning, and stomach pain.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-10881-800-FDA-1088

What is PRADAXA?

PRADAXA is a prescription blood thinner medicine that lowers the chance of blood clots forming in your body. PRADAXA is used to:

  • reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots in people who have a medical condition called atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem. With atrial fibrillation, part of the heart does not beat the way it should. This can lead to blood clots forming and increase your risk of a stroke.
  • treat blood clots in the veins of your legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism) and reduce the risk of them occurring again.

PRADAXA is not for use in people with artificial (prosthetic) heart valves.

Please see full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

The health information contained in this Website is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare professional. All decisions regarding patient care must be made with a healthcare professional, considering the unique characteristics of the patient.

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. either owns or uses the trademarks Pradaxa®, PRADAXA with associated design ®, SolutionsPlus® and related images under license. Other referenced trademarks are owned by third parties.

This site is intended for U.S. residents only. Products discussed herein may have different names and labeling in different countries.

Use of this site is subject to the Internet Site Legal Notices and Disclaimers and Privacy Notice

Copyright © 2015 Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All Rights Reserved. [12/15]

PC-PXD-0219-CONS